Day Four of Hanukkah

Traditional Chanukah Potato Latkes 

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You'll need onion, oil, salt, potatoes, eggs, flour and oil. While the recipe works with any type of potato, using Yukon Gold will be much more aesthetically pleasing because they discolor much more slowly than other potatoes and will keep your mixture looking bright and fresh for longer. They also have a buttery taste which will take your latkes to the next level.

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Most latke recipes call for raw onion, but I like to fry them off first to give the latkes more flavor. Dice the onion and sauté it in 2 tbsp. oil and 1 tsp. salt until golden.

Peel and grate the potatoes (by hand or with a food processor) and immediately put the potato shreds into a bowl of cold water. Continue shredding until all the potatoes are grated.

Place the eggs, flour, fried onion and 2 tsp. salt in a separate bowl. Drain the grated potato well, add it to the rest of the ingredients and mix immediately.

Heat 2-4 tbsp. of oil in a frying pan, over medium heat. Test the oil by dropping a tiny bit of the mixture into the pan. When the oil sizzles upon contact, it is ready.

TIP: Add a small piece of carrot to the oil you're frying in. When the carrot starts to looks shriveled and brown, replace it with a fresh piece. The carrot helps absorb the burnt taste from the oil, and you can keep frying for longer without changing the oil.

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For uniform latkes, use a 1/4 or 1/8 cup measuring cup. Scoop the batter and gently drop it into the oil. Press down gently with the back of the measuring cup to flatten. Fry 2-3 minutes until golden, then flip the latkes and fry 1-2 minutes on the second side. Repeat until all the mixture has been fried. (You will need to add more oil to the pan every couple of batches.)

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Latkes taste best fresh, but if you need to make them in advance, I recommend reheating them in a frying pan with a tiny bit of oil to help them crisp up again.

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I recently realized that while I've shared my recipes for corn latkesbutternut squash sweet potato latkesvegetable latkes and beet latkes stuffed with goat cheese, I've never shared my traditional potato recipe.

 

 

You'll need onion, oil, salt, potatoes, eggs, flour and oil. While the recipe works with any type of potato, using Yukon Gold will be much more aesthetically pleasing because they discolor much more slowly than other potatoes and will keep your mixture looking bright and fresh for longer. They also have a buttery taste which will take your latkes to the next level.

 

 

Most latke recipes call for raw onion, but I like to fry them off first to give the latkes more flavor. Dice the onion and sauté it in 2 tbsp. oil and 1 tsp. salt until golden.

Peel and grate the potatoes (by hand or with a food processor) and immediately put the potato shreds into a bowl of cold water. Continue shredding until all the potatoes are grated.

Place the eggs, flour, fried onion and 2 tsp. salt in a separate bowl. Drain the grated potato well, add it to the rest of the ingredients and mix immediately.

Heat 2-4 tbsp. of oil in a frying pan, over medium heat. Test the oil by dropping a tiny bit of the mixture into the pan. When the oil sizzles upon contact, it is ready.

TIP: Add a small piece of carrot to the oil you're frying in. When the carrot starts to looks shriveled and brown, replace it with a fresh piece. The carrot helps absorb the burnt taste from the oil, and you can keep frying for longer without changing the oil.

 

 

For uniform latkes, use a 1/4 or 1/8 cup measuring cup. Scoop the batter and gently drop it into the oil. Press down gently with the back of the measuring cup to flatten. Fry 2-3 minutes until golden, then flip the latkes and fry 1-2 minutes on the second side. Repeat until all the mixture has been fried. (You will need to add more oil to the pan every couple of batches.)

 

 

Latkes taste best fresh, but if you need to make them in advance, I recommend reheating them in a frying pan with a tiny bit of oil to help them crisp up again.

 

 

Looking for a gluten free potato latke recipe? Try this one.

Ingredients:

  • ½ an onion
  • 2 tbsp. oil
  • 3 tsp. kosher salt, divided
  • 1.5 lbs. Yukon Gold potatoes
  • 2 eggs
  • ¼ cup flour
  • Oil for frying

Directions:

  1. Dice the onion and sauté it in 2 tbsp. oil and 1 tsp. salt until golden.
  2. Grate the potatoes (by hand or in a food processor). Immediately transfer the grated potato to a bowl of cold water.
  3. Place the eggs, flour, fried onion and 2 tsp. salt in a separate bowl. Drain the grated potato well, add it to the rest of the ingredients and mix immediately.
  4. Heat 2-4 tbsp. of oil in a frying pan, over medium heat. Test the oil by dropping a tiny bit of the mixture into the pan. When the oil sizzles upon contact, it is ready.
  5. For uniform latkes, use a 1/4 or 1/8 cup measuring cup. Scoop the batter and gently drop it into the oil. Press down gently with the back of the measuring cup to flatten. Fry 2-3 minutes until golden, then flip the latkes and fry 1-2 minutes on the second side. Repeat until all the mixture has been fried. (You will need to add more oil to the pan every couple of batches.)

Yields: 16 latkes

I know some people are staunch apple sauce and sour cream latke-eaters, but I've never really been able to wrap my mind (or taste-buds) around either of those. I prefer my latkes straight up.

This post originally published on http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/2770486/jewish/Traditional-Chanukah-Potato-Latkes.htm

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David Ramsey

David Ramsey is an Intuitive Healer committed to helping individuals and communities thrive in health and vitality. His experience in the healing fields spans over two decades with over 2,500 hours of training professionally. The journey began with an introduction into conscious awareness of language patterns through NLP in 1999. David realized then that we hold those patterns in our bodies and began trainings in Massage Therapy, Zen Shiatsu, Five Element Theory, Intuitive Healing and Energetic Medicine to help individuals release those inhibiting patterns. David’s studies led to an even deeper examination of Consciousness and inquiry into our Belief Systems and how we can create and dis-create our beliefs at will to create a happier more joy full life.

David’s expertise and passion lies in assisting release of chronic concerns and issues on physical, mental, emotional and spiritual levels. His approach to personal and professional growth is threefold in Body, Mind, & Spirit. When your body feels good your mind is free to create, and when your mind is free to create, you spirit can soar!

“Each person walks a path. My aim is to honor that path and help them expand the awareness of who they are to release Physical, Emotional, and Spiritual disharmonies. My hope and desire is to inspire people and help them experience joy in their life more often than not.” – David

David’s Certifications include: Graduated Phoenix Therapeutic Massage Collage (1993), Usui Reiki and Terra Mai Reiki Master Teacher (1993), Bachelors in Religious Studies from Arizona State University (1999), Graduated Zen Shiatsu School with added focus in Five Element Chinese Medical Theory (2003), Certificate in NLP (1989), Completed Avatar Master Training (2005) and Certified in Energetic Medicine through Victoria Merkle School of Energetic Medicine (2010).